Manchester Pub Crawls

 

 

 


Crawl One The Old Pint Pot pub near to Salford Crescent Station to The Atlas Bar, Deansgate Station

Having lived in Manchester for most of our lives, we feel that we know the pubs here very well. We organise pub crawls of the city at least twice a year, with around 30 to 40 friends joining us. We have listed our favourite crawls, then our top ten pubs of the city centre. Manchester was founded by the Romans but grew as a vast industrial city in the Victorian age. The oldest pub dates back to 1544, with quite a few being Grade 2 listed buildings, dating back 100's of years. Various exciting stories can be discovered on the crawls with tales of murder, ghosts and arson. The pubs have survived bombings, and the threat of demolition - even in recent times. Most of our crawls start and end near a station making them handy to access or stay in Manchester for a few days to discover many museums, historic locations and walking tours. It is certainly a fantastic city to visit.

Crawl One-don't be put off by the starting location being slightly out of the city in Salford, as it is convenient from Manchester City Centre by train or bus and ends back in the City. It is a fascinating area with some historic buildings to visit. Leaving Salford Crescent station, turn left and walk for about ten minutes to the first pub. If wishing to take in some local culture prior to the crawl, one passes the very interesting Salford Art Gallery. Check out the fascinating Victorian street created in 1957 when central Salford was being re-developed, containing many original shop fronts and objects. Also found are costumes, paintings and a nice cafe - worth a trip.

1.Old Pint Pot - Adelphi Street, Salford M3 6EN 

A great starting point for the crawl, from Salford Crescent Station turn left and walk for approximately 10 minutes towards Manchester. The pub is beautifully located on the banks of the River Irwell with a beer garden. There are plenty of different beers and great quality food. Don't let the modern appearance put you off. Popular in term time with students. Very friendly bar staff.

2. New Oxford - 11 Bexley Square, Salford M3 6DB

Found in a quiet location just off the A6. It is a cosy two-roomed, recently refurbished corner-house, dating from the1830's with a modernised interior. A real favourite for beer drinkers with over 40 draught beers and ciders and around 200 bottled Belgium beers.

On the square is the Magistrates Court with a plaque on the outside which commemorates the battle of Bexley Square. This took place on1st October 1931 when 10,000 Salford people marched on the old Town Hall (now the Magistrates Court and Grade 2 listed) in Bexley Square demanding no cuts to unemployment benefit, no cuts to teachers' salaries, free coal for the unemployed in the winter, free milk for children under five and, interestingly, the abolition of `educational classes and training centres'.

3. Kings Arms - 11 Bloom Street, Salford M3 6AN

An impressive Grade 2 listed red brick building dating from 1883. The pub name is in mosaic above the door and a carved Royal Arms is situated high above this. Spot the photos of David Bowie in the snug on the left of the entrance, the main lounge is an oval room, with the main bar providing a great range of beers. Another corridor leads to the beer garden. This pub hosts the UKs oldest angling club, and has theatre space and live music, and even has a weekly knitting club. The pub has been used as a film location for Cracker and more recently Fresh Meat. This is a real community pub, and used to be run by the musician Paul Heaton.

Over the road are two interesting buildings, Salford Lodging House and the Gas Offices dating from 1880, 3 years before the pub. Presumably providing customers for the pub when it opened.

4. Egerton Arms - 2 Gore Street, Salford M3 5FP

Situated conveniently next to Salford Central Station. The Egerton Arms dates from around 1841. On the pub sign is a coat of arms with the motto "Virtuti-Non-Armis-Fifo" translates as "I Trust in virtue not in arms". It is thought that the pub name originates from Lord Egerton of Tatton Park, who was Chairman of the Manchester Ship Canal company . A Joseph Holts pub, as it says - traditionally Manchester's finest ales.

Cross over the River Irwell on Albert Bridge which provides the border between Salford and Manchester. The bridge was opened in 1843 at a cost of around £9,000.

5. Gas Lamp - Bridge Street, Off Deansgate Manchester M3 3BW

One of our top pubs - be careful not to miss the small entrance, then go down the stairs to this subterranean pub. This relatively new pub was converted from the kitchen of the Wood Street Children's Mission. Checkout the historic information and pictures found throughout the various rooms. This pub is like a time capsule with its washed out yellow walled tiles, and original workhouse and school features. There is a small bar with plenty of drink options at one end of a large room.

6. The Bridge Tavern - Bridge Street M3 3BW

The Bridge has a narrow frontage but call in as it is nicely decked out with a wooden bar and floor. It used to concentrate on food, but now has a large drinking area at the front, at the rear there is a small patio. The furniture ranges from bar stools to tub armchairs. Spot the 2 Buddha statutes found behind the long bar.

Walk down Deansgate whilst admiring the facade of the Great Northern Warehouse. This is one of the longest buildings of this type in Europe.

7. Dimitris Taverna- 322-326 Deansgate M3 4FN

Not really a pub, more of a Spanish tapas restaurant. But always nice to visit, with friendly owners and a great atmosphere. Note the exquisite building housing this pub, with a coat of arms found on the top of the facade. This states the Manchester motto of "Concilio et Labore" meaning through "council and hard work" or "by working together we can achieve great things."

8. The Deansgate Tavern - 321 Deansgate M3 4LQ

The pub was formerly known as The Crown, and has held a licence from the 18th century, one of the oldest licences in Manchester. It has a nice 1920s exterior, and a traditional multi roomed interior. In winter warm up by the huge fireplace whilst admiring the wooden wall panels, and the wooden bar area. Upstairs is a nice, but popular terraced area. This is the most convenient pub if staying in the Hilton Hotel found virtually next door.

9. The White Lion - 43 Liverpool Road M3 4NQ 

This pub dates back to 1778, even before the World's first modern passenger railway system was built nearby in 1830 - launching the railway revolution. It is adjacent to the reconstructed foundations of a Roman fort, and over the road from the Manchester Museum of Science and Technology. Don't miss the Manchester United memorabilia featured on all the walls and interesting aerial photos featuring Manchester's past. There are lots of ales, food, and an outdoor area. Another one of our favourites.

10 Oxnoble - 71 Liverpool Road M3 4NQ

This rather strange name comes from the potatoes that used to come to the city by canal from West Lancashire and sold at the market that used to be held in the building opposite, now part of the Museum of Science and Technology. The Oxnoble dates from 1804. It has more recently had a make-over, but still has the appearance of a locals' pub serving traditional cask ales, wines, malt whiskeys and food.

11 Knot Bar - 374 Deansgate M3 4LY

A great location, the Knot Bar is under one of the arches of the Deansgate railway viaduct, and the trains can be heard rumbling overhead adding to the atmosphere. There are many different ales, and food served till10pm with pizza, and ciabatta sandwiches - handy if you wish to snack before heading home. The Knott is payment by card only.
The pub stands near an old manufacturing site known as Knot Mill. This was home to W & J Galloway &Sons, engineering works producing steam trains which were exported all over the world. The railway viaduct is a listed structure, and together with the various local canals, illustrated how many transportation routes ran through the area during the industrial revolution.
12 Atlas Bar - 376 Deansgate M3 4LY

Situated like the Knott Bar under the arches of Deansgate Station. If you like gin you are at the correct location. At the last count there were over 520 varieties, the largest offer in the city centre. Winner of the best spirits bar and best bar team North West awards, and a finalist in 2019 in the Star Pub awards for best spirits bar in the U.K. Since it opened a couple of decades ago it has been refurbished more recently. On a sunny day check out the beer garden found behind the bar.

If there are too many pubs on this list our favourites are:- The New Oxford, The Kings Arms, Gas Lamp and The White Lion. I would skip maybe The Egerton Arms, The Bridge and Dimitris. But they all have something individual about them.

Whichever pubs you visit in Manchester, you can be certain of a friendly welcome, great beers, and lots of history. Some serve food. What amazes us is the number of bars that still remain, that have not been bombed or demolished.

We hope that you have enjoyed this crawl and hopefully see you soon on another .

 

 

 

 

Crawl Two Dimitris, Deansgate station to The Salisbury Oxford Road Station

Crawl Two - We feel this is a great crawl for December, as it keeps away from the very busy pubs in the City Centre, and the Christmas markets. It starts very near Deansgate Station, and skirts round the east of the City to Oxford Road Station - both stations are good transport hubs.
1 Dimitris Taverna- 322-326 Deansgate M3 4FN

Not really a pub, more of a Spanish tapas restaurant. But always nice to visit, with friendly owners and a great atmosphere. If meeting friends at lunchtime it is open earlier than other pubs in the area. Note the exquisite building housing this pub, with a coat of arms found on the top of the facade. This states the Manchester motto of "Concilio et Labore" meaning through "council and hard work" or "by working together we can achieve great things." A convenient start being near Deansgate Station.

2 Oxnoble -71 Liverpool Road M3 4NQ

This rather strange name comes from the potatoes that used to come to the city by canal from West Lancashire, and sold at the market that used to be held in the building opposite. Now part of the Museum of Science and Technology . The Oxnoble dates from 1804. It has more recently had a make-over but still has the appearance of a locals pub, serving traditional cask ales, wines, malt whiskeys and food.

3. The White Lion - 43 Liverpool Road M3 4NQ 

This pub dates back to 1778, even before the World's first modern passenger railway system was built nearby in 1830-launching the railway revolution. It is adjacent to the reconstructed foundations of a Roman fort, and over the road from the Manchester Museum of Science and Technology. Don't miss the Manchester United memorabilia featured on all the walls and interesting aerial photos featuring Manchester's past. There are lots of ales, food, and an outdoor area. Another of our favourites.

4 The Deansgate Tavern - 321 Deansgate M3 4LQ

The pub was formerly known as The Crown, and has held a licence from the 18th century, one of the oldest licences in Manchester. It has a nice 1920s exterior, and a traditional multi roomed interior. In winter warm up by the huge fireplace, whilst admiring the wooden wall panels, and the wooden bar area. Upstairs is a nice, but popular terraced area. This is the most convenient pub if staying in the Hilton Hotel found virtually next door.

5 Knot Bar - 374 Deansgate M3 4LY

A great location, the Knot bar is under one of the arches of the Deansgate railway viaduct, and the trains can be heard rumbling overhead adding to the atmosphere. There are many different ales, and food served till 10pm with pizza and ciabatta sandwiches- handy if you wish to snack before heading home. The Knott is payment by card only.
The pub stands near an old manufacturing site known as Knot Mill, this was home to W & J Galloway &Sons engineering works, producing steam trains were exported all over the world. The railway viaduct is a listed structure, and together with the canals, illustrate how many transportation routes ran through the area during the industrial revolution.
6 Atlas Bar - Deansgate

Situated like the Knott Bar under the arches of Deansgate Station. If you like gin, you are at the correct location. At the last count there were over 520 varieties, the largest offer in the city centre. Winner of best spirits bar and best bar team North West awards, and a finalist in 2019 in the Star Pub awards for best spirits bar in the U.K. Since it opened a couple of decades ago it has been refurbished more recently. On a sunny day check out the beer garden found behind the bar.

7. The City Road 14 Albion Street M1 5NZ

This pub dates from 1898 and is situated on a busy corner location close to the Bridgewater Hall and the Deansgate Locks area. From the outside the pub appears quite large, but looks can be deceptive. Inside the pub has just two rooms, one housing the main bar and the other a pool table. The inside has bare wooden beams, and brewing equipment. The pub is extremely busy on Manchester United match days with several televisions and drop down screens.
 
8. The Briton's Protection 50 Great Bridgewater Street, M1 5LE 

This is a pub that can't be missed, stand back and admire the interesting outside.
The pub opened in 1811, and was said to be a recruiting centre for soldiers enlisting to fight Napoleon, hence its name. It benefitted from having a major re-fit in the 1930s. There is a small room at the front with the bar in, which has over 300 whiskies to choose from, and a great selection of real ales. There are a further 5 rooms, in winter find the roaring fire. At the back is found a nice beer garden. Take time to examine the fantastic mural of the nearby Peterloo Massacre of 1819, in which 15 demonstrators were killed and more than 700 injured by the cavalry who charged the crowd.

The pub being situated next to the very modern Bridgewater Hall often has a very mixed clientele with theatre goers, musicians from the local Halle orchestra, and whiskey lovers joining real ale drinkers.

9. Gas Works, 5 Jack Rosenthal Street, M15 4RA
This pub is very different from the ones visited so far found in this recently re-developed area, opening in 2016. It is built on the site of the old Gaythorn Gas Works-hence its name. It is a large open pub serving food with various tables and booths dotted throughout . Have a try at the Norwegian game of Shuffl to provide a great finish to the day. There is a six-barrel microbrewery onsite which produces the Refractory Pale Ale house beer.
Check out this square with The HOME cinema complex, hotels and restaurants. In front of the Gas Works examine the statue of Friedrich Engels, resident of Manchester on and off for about 22 years. It was during his time in the city that he wrote "The Condition of the Working Class in England’, which was published in 1845, based on living conditions in the city at that time.
10. The Salisbury Ale House 2 Wakefield Street, M1 5NE

The Salisbury is located just off Oxford Road at the bottom of a steep cobbled street. It is one of many beautifully tiled Manchester pubs, with glossy green and brown tiles on the outside. Inside is a nice wooden interior, spilt into several areas. If Theakston's bitter is your choice of drink, this is the pub for you, obviously with a good range of other drinks too.

The pub was named after the Marquess of Salisbury born in 1830, an M.P. and 3 times Prime Minister. There is a plaque on the wall which says the pub once sat within one of the poorest areas of Manchester known as "Little Ireland", as it had a high population of Irish settlers. It has managed to survive redevelopment of the surrounding area and is now popular with workers, students and drinkers. It has music on a Saturday night.

This is a great location to finish the crawl, just follow the steps outside the pub to arrive at Oxford Road Station.

If you only want to go to a couple of these pubs we would definitely recommend The White Lion, The Knot Bar, The Briton's Protection and The Salisbury. If you have less time, I would skip Dimitris. But they all have something individual about them.

Whichever pubs you visit in Manchester, you can be certain of a friendly welcome, great beers, and lots of history. Some serve food. What amazes us is the number of bars that still remain, that have not been bombed or demolished.

We hope that you have enjoyed this crawl and see you soon on the next one.

 

 

 

 


Crawl Three, The Salisbury Ale House Oxford Road Station to Mother Macs, nearest Station is Manchester Piccadilly

Crawl Three. This starts at Oxford Road Station, and winds its way into the city centre proper. The last couple of pubs are a 10 or 15 minute walk from Piccadilly Railway Station.

1 The Salisbury Ale House 2 Wakefield Street, M1 5NE

The Salisbury is located just off Oxford Road at the bottom of a steep cobbled street, beside the viaduct of Oxford Road Station. Or if leaving the Station, take the flight of steps outside. This Makes it a very convenient first meeting point. It is one of many beautifully tiled Manchester pubs, with glossy green and brown tiles on the outside. Inside a nice wooden interior, spilt into several areas. If Theakston's bitter is your choice of drink, this is the pub for you, obviously with a good range of
other drinks too.

The pub was named after the Marquess of Salisbury born in 1830, an M.P. and 3 times Prime Minister. There is a plaque on the wall which says the pub once sat within one of the poorest areas of Manchester known as "Little Ireland", as it had a high population of Irish settlers. It has managed to survive redevelopment of the surrounding area and is now popular with workers, students and drinkers. It has music on a Saturday night.

2. Lass ‘O’Gowrie 36 Charles Street, Manchester, M1 7DB 

Like the Salisbury this pub was also in "Little Ireland" and is on the map from 1844. It has done well to survive as so much around it has been demolished, and it has been threatened with closure. Apparently the original landlord was Scottish, naming the pub after his favourite poem, "The Lass O'Gowrie" by Scottish poet Lady Carolina Naime .

Again like the Salisbury it is hidden away in a quiet location. This pub is a must to visit:- from the Victorian tiles outside, to the exquisite bar, and pictures of famous Mancunians lining the walls inside. There are lots of hand pulled ales and good food too. During the week it is visited by students with open mic and quiz nights. It tends to be quieter at the weekends. There is a small outdoor area built over the River Medlock. In the Great British Pub Awards of 2012 is was voted 'National Pub of the Year 2012'. Don't miss the toilets!!!

A plaque outside describes the pub as "A traditional Mancunian Alehouse- free of tie, on locally brewed real ales" A warm welcome awaits you, great food, cask ales, and live sports. Another favourite.

3. O’Sheas Irish Bar 80 Princess Street, M1 3NZ 
This pub first opened in 1994 with the then Republic Of Ireland football manager Jack Charlton pouring the first pint of Guinness. Since then an estimated 2 million pints of Guinness have been served at the venue. The pub is in a historic former warehouse building in the middle of what was once Manchester’s ‘Little Ireland’. There is a sign above the door 'Old Union Bank' was once based here.
It has more recently undergone a £200,000 makeover. The drinks collection features one of the biggest ranges of Irish whiskies and gins, vodkas and ales – alongside what bosses claim is "the finest pint of Guinness" the city has to offer. Observe the traditional Irish look of the bar - with stylish decor, seating and plenty of retro Guinness signage.

4. The Old Monkey 90/92 Portland Street, M14GX
This pub opened in 1993 on the site of the Queens Arms. This was Manchester brewer, Joseph Holt's first ever new-build house in the city. This serves a full range of Joseph Holt cask ales - any fans of Mild will be happy in here and great food. It is set on two floors where the downstairs always seems to be busy, mainly in a standing drinking area with seats around the edge of the room. Upstairs has its own bar, serving food and drink and providing great views of the bustle of the Princess Street junction.
5. The Circus Tavern 86 Portland Street, M1 4GX

The inscription outside reads."The smallest bar in Europe, the biggest welcome in the World." Built in about 1790, it is also one of the oldest pubs in Manchester, although it only became a pub in about 1840. The pub is owned by Tetley's, a local brewery, and contains photographs of former Manchester United players who frequented the pub, including George Best. It was listed as a Grade 2 building in 1994. As it only fits one bar person there is also waitress service. 

The name comes from a circus that was founded locally by Mr Hardy in the late 1790s, they apparently used to perform here. The circus went on tour to Liverpool, and Dublin, the boat sank with all on board. Mr Hardy survived as he was catching a later boat. A plaque outside reads, " by virtue of its historic interest merits the title a Tetley Heritage Inn".

On the way to the next pub make sure you see the Chinese Archway. Built in China in 1987 as a present for Manchester, and has more recently been restored. It is the only one of its kind in Europe. Manchester's Chinatown district is the 2nd largest in Britain and 4th largest in Europe.

6. The Seven Oaks 5 Nicholas St, M1 4HL

Built in the1920s, this is located on the edge of Chinatown, a two-storey building with the traditional wooden bar being downstairs. It has a fantastic selection of
alcohol and a good menu of pie and mash. Sports are shown on various television screens.

7. The City Arms 46 Kennedy Street,  M2 4BQ 

This is one of a line of 3 pubs - great if one of them is too busy, tucked away down a quiet street near the Town Hall. It is a fairly small traditional pub, decorated in dark wood, occupying a former 18th Century town house. Some nice old photos line the walls, don't miss the glazed tiling on the way to the toilet. A good variety of ales on tap. Always features in The Good Pub Guide.

8 The Vine 42 Kennedy Street, Manchester, M2 4BQ

Next door to The City Arms, this pub dates prior to 1886. Absolutely stunning green tiling on the outside, and stained glass windows. It is deceptively large, being split over 3 levels, check out the large range of whiskies. The pub occupies 2 buildings the first is an 18th Century town house with a row of windows on the upper floor that would resemble those in a weaver's cottage. The 2nd building used to be an office/warehouse building .

9 The Shakespeare 16 Fountain Street, M2 2AA

A tavern has stood here since 1771. But the existing structure started life in1636 as "The Shambles" public house in Chester. It was dismantled and transported to Manchester and re-built in 1928. It has a large bar area with wooden flooring, look out for old features inside and outside.

The pub is reputed to be haunted by the ghost of a young girl who was raped and murdered by the chef, who subsequently went on to hang himself in the pub. The rope marks where he hung himself are reportedly visible on the beam just inside the pub, check them out if so inclined. The ghost is reported to stand on the top of the stairs, appearing to be on fire.

10 The English Lounge 64-66 High Street, M4 1EA

We are not sure of the history of this pub established in 1888. We always like the spacious inside with plenty of chairs and tables. Checkout the interesting prints on the walls, nice tiled mosaic on the floor and bookshelves. It has a good range of cask ales, and wines from across the World. A good selection of food is found too.
The outside maybe dates from the 1920s with beautiful hanging baskets. If you have had enough of drinking visit the Arndale Centre found opposite!!!

11 The Unicorn 26 Church Street, M4 1PN

This 3 storey hotel, built in 1924 is now a Grade 2 listed building, is a real locals establishment!!! A large central bar dominates the pub with seating all round. Many original fittings survive with wooden panelling. Snug rooms are found at the rear. Don't miss the interesting collection of naval themed pictures. We often stay here for a while dancing to the live bands, or singers found here on a Saturday night.

12 Mother Macs, 33 Back Piccadilly, M1 1HP
We dare you to enter this small pub down a back street off Oldham Road, with many interesting characters in. It seems to open at will depending if customers are there or not. Make time to read the framed newspaper articles about the horrific murders and subsequent arson attack which took place here on 18th June 1976.
If you only want to go to a couple of these pubs we would definitely recommend The Salisbury, Lass ‘O’Gowrie, The City Arms, and The Vine. I would skip O’Sheas, The Seven Oaks, The Unicorn and Mother Macs. But they all have something individual about them.

Whichever pubs you visit in Manchester, you can be certain of a friendly welcome, great beers, and lots of history. Some serve food. What amazes us is the number of bars that still remain, that have not been bombed or demolished.

We hope that you have enjoyed this crawl.

 

 

 

 

Crawl Four In the true city centre from Sinclair's Oyster Bar, The Shambles to The Flok Bar Stevenson Square

Crawl Four. This starts in Exchange Square in the centre of the city. Walk 15 minutes or catch the tram from Piccadilly Station. Check out the old Corn Exchange building on one side of the square. The crawl then goes to many of our favourite historic bars in the Northern Quarter. Finishing a convenient ten minute walk back to Piccadilly station. A wise move maybe to check out the football fixtures, as some of these pubs are full of City fans on match days.

1  Sinclair's Oyster Bar, Cathedral Gates, M3 1SW 

This is a very popular area, so arrive early to get a seat. Great for beer in the sun whilst basking in historic surroundings. You may never wish to leave. The prices here are some of the cheapest in Manchester, when we visited it was a cash only bar. Note the pub sign, for 58 years the pub was run by an ex-soldier named John Shaw. In the 18th century by law closing time was 8pm, if customers were still there the maid Molly Owen would throw a bucket of water over them. After John Shaws' death in 1796 it was re-named Sinclair's, oysters being added to the menu and name in 1845.

Sinclair's is Grade 2 listed, and dates from 1738, having survived World War II, and the Arndale bombing in 1996. The Old Wellington next door, and Sinclair's Oyster Bar have been moved twice,1st in 1971 to make room for the Arndale Centre, and then in 1996 they were moved brick by brick from their original location 300 meters away to their current site as part of a regeneration project. The Old Wellington pub next door is the city centre's only surviving Tudor building and is the oldest building of its kind in Manchester, being built in 1552. Check out the inside of The Wellington and plaque on the outside. On the 3rd side of the square is the Mitre Hotel built in 1815, next door to that is The Crown and Anchor, a Joseph Holts pub. One need never leave these 4 pubs alone, but we have other places to be!.

2 The Lower Turks Head, 36 Shudehill, M4 1EZ

This pub originates from 1745, and on the outside is found a fantastic 1920s tiled facade. The pub reopened in August 2013 after being closed for 22 years. There are several small rooms downstairs as well as an upstairs drinking area that leads to a roof terrace - always fun on a sunny day. Next door is Scuttlers wine bar, named after the famous 19th century Manchester gangs. This is now joined to the Lower Turks effectively making the pub bigger. Check out the beautifully tiled toilets.

3 Hare & Hounds, 46 Shudehill, M4 4AA

One of many Grade 2 listed pubs in the area, having a nationally important historic interior and a tiled front. The original building dates back to about 1800, and it was re-modelled in about 1925. Like many pubs in the North of England the bar is found down a corridor in the middle of the pub. The front room is the vault with fixed bench seating, the lounge room is found at the back with bell-pushes for table service, and a 1920s fire-place. Admire the brown tiled walls, and glazed screens. The pub is usually busy, but not a problem with competent bar staff selling John Holts beers.

4 The Angel, 6 Angel Street, M4 4BQ  

The Angel is found in area just north of the Northern Quarter which is fast being redeveloped. It is an old pub with character, however looking rather scruffy from the outside. Check out the photos of old Manchester on the walls. The pub has a good selection of beers on tap and bottled specially selected real ales, lagers and ciders from all around the UK.

This is a solid locals' pub, with food, live music, and real fires. We love playing the piano in here, and have had many sing a longs. Outside is a great seating area, with plenty of tables and chairs.

5 Marble Arch, 73 Rochdale Road, M4 4HY

The Marble Arch is slightly out of town down Rochdale Road, but definitely worth the walk. Described as having one of the finest traditional pub interiors in Manchester. The listed pub dates from 1888, with an elaborate entrance and beautiful interior with a tile mosaic. It also has an award winning micro brewery Marble Beers and serves food, together with a lovely atmosphere. Don't let the walk put you off. One of our favourites.

6 Smithfield Market Tavern, 37 Swan Street, M4 5JZ
This pub now run by Manchester based Blackjack Brewery has won various awards- Manchester CAMRA Best newcomer 2015; Central Manchester CAMRA Pub of the Year 2016; Manchester Food and Drink Festival 2016 AWARDS Pub of the Year.
If cider is your tipple, it has been selected as Central Manchester CAMRA Cider Pub of the Year for 2019 for a superb selection of fine ciders. Also sold are cask ales, and keg beers. There is plenty of furniture from couches to a large table, try your hand at darts, table skittles and there is a good selection of board games. It is named after the old Smithfield Market, note the building next door dating from 1857. The building itself claims to be from 1823.
7 Crown & Kettle, 2 Oldham Street, M4 5FE

A pub has stood on this site since 1734, previously being called the Iron Dish & Cob of Coal. A prime location in its hay day, convenient for the nearby Smithfield Markets, and the Daily Express workers - which used to be located next door. There were public toilets on the front, and 2 entrances from Great Ancoats Street and one on Oldham Street. It was closed down in1989 following trouble between Manchester City and United fans and the general decline of the whole area. The pub then suffered from vandals and a couple of arson attacks. It was reopened in 2005 and has without doubt the greatest pub ceiling in Manchester, nets have now been installed in case any plaster should fall down. The original pub was one large imposing room, three contrasting rooms now exist - the vault, a small snug and a lounge, all served from the central bar with friendly staff.

This huge Grade 2 listed building has to be visited to admire the ceiling and has a great selection of hand pulled beers. It does get busy on Manchester City match days, with fans meeting here before going to the Ethiad Stadium. It has won various awards including - Greater Manchester CAMRA regional Pub of the Year 2015 and Central Manchester Pub of the Year 2019. Another favourite.
 
8 The Castle Hotel, 66 Oldham St, M4 1LE

This pub stands out in the Northern Quarter and must be visited. It was first opened in 1776. Start by admiring the brown tiled and mosaic facade added in 1898, followed inside by a fantastic mahogany bar, with a ceramic glazed bar counter front, one of only 13 such examples in the whole of the UK. Look down for the magnificent mosaic floor of 'The Castle'. Behind the bar is the snug containing old-fixed seating, and bell-pushes. Down the corridor to a beautiful performance room with a glorious timber skylight, finally a nice compact outdoor area. It always features in The Good Pub Guide. The current owners took over in 2009, and have restored the interior to its 19th century glory. In the late 20th century many a music lover has stopped here on their way to see live acts at the local Band On the Wall music venue. In 1979 the pub hosted the famous interview between John Peel and Ian Curtis of Joy Division fame.

9 The Unicorn, 26 Church Street, M4 1PN

This 3 storey hotel, built in 1924 is now a Grade 2 listed building, is a real locals establishment. A large central bar dominates the pub with seating all round. Many original fittings survive with wooden panelling. Snug rooms are found at the rear. Don't miss the interesting collection of naval themed pictures. We often stay here for a while dancing to the live bands, or singers, found here on a Saturday night.

10 The Flok Bar 5 Stevenson Square M11DN

This bar is different to the other pubs we have visited today. But we love the light airy room, tiled walls and tables by the windows looking out onto Stevenson Square. Opened in 2017 serving Spanish vermouth on draught and with a huge range of fortified wines. It also has a great stock of 5 hand pulled craft beers and 7 locally brewed ales. Alongside this with friendly helpful bar staff this is one of our favourite new bars found in Manchester. There is also a nice seating area outside. Downstairs the original bank vault is found showing the origins of this bar.

Whichever pubs you visit in Manchester, you can be certain of a friendly welcome, great beers, and lots of history. Some serve food. What amazes us is the number of bars that still remain, that have not been bombed or demolished.

If you only want to go to a couple of these pubs we would definitely recommend Sinclair's, The Marble Arch, Crown and Kettle and The Castle. If you have less time, I would skip The Smithfield Tavern and The Unicorn. But they all have something individual about them.

We hope that you have enjoyed this crawl.

 

 

 

 

Crawl Five The Footage Oxford Road to The Salisbury Oxford Road Station

Crawl Five-we feel this is a good crawl for December as it keeps away from the very busy pubs in the city centre, and the Christmas markets, starting and ending at Oxford Road Station. During term-time this area is popular with students from the nearby Universities. Otherwise the bars are fairly quiet except for when music events, football or quiz nights etc are held in some of them.
"The Oxford Road Corridor is a street where extraordinary things happen, the atom was split, Noel Gallagher bought his first guitar, Emmeline Pankhurst sparked social change, the first computer was built, graphene was discovered. A corridor to endless possibilities" - taken from a plaque on the street.

1. The Footage, 135 Grosvenor Street M1 7HE

A perfect bar to kick off the crawl. A great range of beers and lagers at reasonable prices. It boosts the biggest sports screen in Manchester, and multiple large screens so several games can be shown at once. But be careful if you are not a sports fan - choose the timing of your visit carefully.

This building was originally the Grosvenor Cinema opening in 1915, having a capacity of just under 1,000 people, it was the largest cinema outside London. Its rise and fall is based on the changing population density of the local area. In the 1960's with much of Manchester's population moving further from the city centre it went into decline. It shut as a cinema in1968, then first re-opened as as a bingo hall, then becoming Riley's Snooker Club, before being boarded up for several years. In 1990 it was converted to pub use by the Firkin chain to become their first Manchester house, the Flea & Firkin, with its own on-site brewery in the old snooker hall in the basement.

In mid-2014 the pub was rejuvenated with a thorough refurbishment costing £360,000. Now there are a good assortment of chairs and tables, long tables, benches, high round tables and chairs - perfect for all sizes of party. Also there are pool tables, and arcade machines. A good selection of food is served all day. See if you can judge where the 'stalls' seating area would be beneath the former upper circle. Checkout the green and cream tiled facade, and original fittings of this Grade 2 listed building.

2. The Deaf Institute, 135 Grosvenor Street, M1 7HE

The Deaf Institute (or Trof Cafe) is an independent bar housed in a historic building, originally built in 1878 as The Deaf Institute - checkout the gothic frontage. The building was derelict twelve years ago when the current owners refurbished it back to something that approaches its original glory. In the main bar there are big sharing tables and leather booths. Local ales and craft beers are served, together with a food menu consisting of about 80% vegetarian and vegan.

The venue has 3 floors-the main bar, then on the first floor the music hall hosts live gigs, comedy and club nights in a ballroom under a massive mirror ball. There is a basement bar, and a small roof terrace with checker plate industrial flooring. Admire the interesting surrounds and wall decor. Before arranging to meet here checkout the opening hours, as sometimes this is more of a evening venue, it may not open till 4pm or 5pm.

3. The Flour and Flagon, 126 Grosvenor Street, M1 7HL 

This former plumbers merchants building started life as an Irish bar in the mid-1990s. Later on it became The Pub, later on still it became Pub - Zoo; that changed in August 2017 to the Flour & Flagon. The pub has a couple of small booths but it is mostly open plan, well furnished with mix and match furniture. At the rear The Bread Shed serving food can be found. A good range of cask beers, botanical gins, together with a football table, sports shown and 2 pool tables are part of the attraction.

4. Sandbar,120-122 Grosvenor Street, M1 7HL

Sandbar opened in 1996 when Grosvenor Street was an out-of the-way forgotten part of Manchester and partly occupies one of Manchester's last industrial era mills. Checkout the range of real ales on seven pumps, locally brewed beer is something which is very important to the owners, look too for the large spirits offering and guest ciders. The pizzas have on-line recommendations.

Sandbar is an interesting conversion of two Georgian townhouses attracting custom from both lecturers and students. A former loading bay is utilised as a seating area, while some former bus seats form part of the varied furnishings. The atmosphere is bohemian and arty. Exhibitions of photographs and paintings hang on the walls. Food such as pizza and sandwiches are served: the entire menu is vegetarian or vegan. Occasional beer festivals are held. It was voted the best pub/craft beer bar at the Manchester food and drink awards 2019. Card only.

 5 The Font, New Wakefield Street, M1 5NP

If you like cocktails then this is the pub for you with prices starting at £2.00, incredible value for money with lots of good reviews too. Offers on other drinks too, with wine selling at £6.00 a bottle. There is a constantly rotating real ale selection. This bar has been featured in the Good Pub Guide. Food is sold all day. Checkout the quirky decor. A favourite with students, and young professionals. DJ's on most evenings.

 We now return to a more traditional type of Manchester pub:-

6 Lass ‘O’Gowrie, 36 Charles Street, M1 7DB 

Like the Salisbury this pub was also in "Little Ireland" and is on the map from 1844. It has done well to survive as so much around it has been demolished, and it has been threatened with closure. Apparently the original landlord was Scottish, naming the pub after his favourite poem, "The Lass O'Gowrie" by Scottish poet Lady Carolina Naime .

Again like the Salisbury it is hidden away in a quiet location. This pub is a must to visit:- from the Victorian tiles outside, to the exquisite bar, and pictures of famous Mancunians lining the walls inside. There are lots of hand pulled ales and good food too. During the week it is visited by students with open mic and quiz nights. It tends to be quieter at the weekends. There is a small outdoor area built over the River Medlock. In the Great British Pub Awards of 2012 is was voted 'National Pub of the Year 2012'. Don't miss the toilets!!!

A plaque outside describes the pub as "A traditional Mancunian Alehouse- free of tie, on locally brewed real ales" A warm welcome awaits you, great food, cask ales, and live sports. Another favourite.

7 The Joshua Brooks, 106 Princess street, M1 6NG

Established in 1993 calling itself "A Manc Institution" as a nighttime music venue. It is again found in the old "Little Ireland" area wedged beside the industrial heritage of the Oxford Road railway viaduct and the River Medlock. This is a sister pub to the Deansgate and Thirsty Scholar. It is a smart modern, yet traditional bar that is both relaxing and busy. There is fixed seating down one side, with dining furniture and Chesterfield sofas in front of the bar. Doors on the opposite side of the room give you access to the river view. Food is served daily until 7pm (5pm weekends), the burgers are recommended by on-line reviews. The pub gets its name from a character in the book "The Manchester Man" by Mrs Linnaeus Banks.
8 O’Sheas Irish Bar, 80 Princess Street, M1 3NZ 
This pub first opened in 1994 with the then Republic Of Ireland football manager Jack Charlton pouring the first pint of Guinness. Since then an estimated 2 million pints of Guinness have been served at the venue. The pub is in a historic former warehouse building in the middle of what was once Manchester’s ‘Little Ireland’. There is a sign above the door 'Old Union Bank' was once based here.
It has more recently undergone a £200,000 makeover. The drinks collection features one of the biggest ranges of Irish whiskies and gins, vodkas and ales – alongside what bosses claim is "the finest pint of Guinness" the city has to offer. Observe the traditional Irish look of the bar - with stylish decor, seating and plenty of retro Guinness signage.

9 The Thirsty Scholar, 50 New Wakefield Street, M1 5NP

The Thirsty Scholar is set just off Oxford Road, in an archway under Oxford Road Station, at the bottom of a steep cobbled street. If following the crawl by the time you arrive here this may just be the perfect end to a perfect day, as it is one of Manchester's best free live music venues. It hosts live entertainment most nights of the week, including bands, comedy nights and even poetry nights. At weekends it has regular 1960s and Northern Soul DJs, together with a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. It is a top place to be.
The pub offers a large selection of draught lager, traditional cask ales, speciality imported world beers and premium packaged larger and ciders. Between 12 noon and 4pm the space is used as Mod's and Vegan Cafe serving breakfast and lunch, ideal for a healthy little snack. Special 'happy hour' prices are offered on drinks 4pm - 8pm Monday to Friday and all-day Sunday. The pub also has some of the latest opening times of any free entry pub in the area.
10 The Salisbury Ale House, 2 Wakefield Street, Manchester, M1 5NE

If the music in The Thirsty Scholar is too much retreat over the road to a quieter pub The Salisbury. It is one of many beautifully tiled Manchester pubs, with glossy green and brown tiles on the outside. Inside a nice wooden interior, spilt into several areas. If Theakston's bitter is your choice of drink, this is the pub for you, obviously with a good range of other drinks too.

The pub was named after the Marquess of Salisbury born in 1830, an M.P. and 3 times Prime Minister. There is a plaque on the wall which says the pub once sat within one of the poorest areas of Manchester known as "Little Ireland", as it had a high population of Irish settlers. It has managed to survive redevelopment of the surrounding area and is now popular with both workers, students and drinkers.

This is a great location to finish the crawl, just follow the steps outside the pub to arrive at Oxford Road Station.

Whichever pubs you visit in Manchester, you can be certain of a friendly welcome, great beers, and lots of history. Some serve food. What amazes us is the number of bars that still remain, that have not been bombed or demolished.

If you only want to go to a couple of these pubs we would definitely recommend The Footage, The Deaf Institute, Lass ‘O’Gowrie, and The Salisbury. If you have less time, I would skip Joshua Brooks and The Font. But they all have something individual about them.

We hope that you have enjoyed this crawl and see you on another.


 

 


Manchester Pub Crawls

Crawl Six, The Salisbury Ale House Oxford Road Station to the Town Hall area

Crawl Six- The crawl begins at Oxford Road Station, skirting round the eastern side of the city, before arriving in the city centre. These pubs are some of the most historic pubs in the city. From the last pub-The Waterhouse, it is a 15 minute walk back to Manchester Piccadilly Station, or catch a tram.

1 The Salisbury Ale House 2 Wakefield Street, M1 5NE

The Salisbury is located just off Oxford Road at the bottom of a steep cobbled street, beside the viaduct of Oxford Road Station. Or if leaving the Station take the flight of steps outside, making it a very convenient first meeting point. It is one of many beautifully tiled Manchester pubs, with glossy green and brown tiles on the outside. Inside is a nice wooden interior, spilt into several areas. If Theakston's bitter is your choice of drink, this is the pub for you, obviously with a good range of other drinks too.

The pub was named after the Marquess of Salisbury born in 1830, an M.P. and 3 times Prime Minister. There is a plaque on the wall which says the pub once sat within one of the poorest areas of Manchester known as "Little Ireland", as it had a high population of Irish settlers. It has managed to survive redevelopment of the surrounding area and is now popular with both workers, students and drinkers. It has music on a Saturday night.

2. The City Road 14 Albion Street M1 5NZ

This pub dates from 1898 and is situated on a busy corner location close to the Bridgewater Hall and the Deansgate Locks area. From the outside the pub appears quite large, but looks can be deceptive. Inside the pub has just two rooms, one housing the main bar and another with a pool table. The inside has bare wooden beams, and brewing equipment. The pub is extremely busy on Manchester United match days with several televisions and drop down screens.
 
3. The Briton's Protection 50 Great Bridgewater Street, M1 5LE 

This is a pub that can't be missed, stand back and admire the interesting outside.
The pub opened in 1811, and was said to be a recruiting centre for soldiers enlisting to fight Napoleon, hence its name. It benefitted from having a major re-fit in the 1930s. There is a small room at the front with the bar in, which has over 300 whiskies to choose from, and a great selection of real ales. There are a further 5 rooms, in winter find the roaring fire. At the back is found a nice beer garden. Take time to examine the fantastic mural of the nearby Peterloo Massacre of 1819, in which 15 demonstrators were killed and more than 700 injured by the cavalry who charged the crowd.

The pub being situated next to the very modern Bridgewater Hall often has a very mixed clientele with theatre goers, musicians from the local Halle orchestra, and whiskey lovers joining real ale drinkers.

4 Rain Bar, 80 Great Bridgewater Street, M15 5JG

A perfect pub for a sunny afternoon with a garden set out with table and chairs backing onto the Rochdale canal. Voted best outdoor terrace in 2016. Many beers are available brewed by local Manchester brewers J.W.Lees, together with a great range of spirits and wine. An extensive food menu is available.
The building is part of a group of buildings (most no longer there) which pre-date 1849. They were a collection of silk and general warehouses, an iron foundry, and umbrella factory- from where its name may be taken.

5 The Peveril of the Peak, 127 Great Bridgewater Street, M1 5JQ

Do not miss this late Georgian pub, if only for the Victorian emerald green external tiling. Inside fantastic decor continues, with more green and cream tiles, together with bell-pushes, a Victorian fire place, and beautiful wood features. This pub was saved from demolition for a road scheme in the 1980's. The pub is now a Grade 2 listed building and the interior is listed as one of historic importance. There are a couple of picnic benches outside.

Another point of interest is the famous football table which having first been brought into the pub in1955, is said to be the oldest pub football table in continuous use in the UK. We are not sure if it is named after Peveril of the Peak novel by Sir Walter Scott published in 1923 or has a link to Peveril Castle in Castleton, perhaps someone will let us know. When Eric Cantona played for Manchester United this was said to be his favourite pub.
 
6 The Abercrombie, 35 Bootle Street, M2 5GU

One of Manchester's oldest pubs, named after Sir Ralph Abercrombie a Scottish soldier and Politician, also the Governor of Trinidad and fought in the French Revolutionary wars. We are not quite sure what his connection to Manchester was though. One of the few pubs dating from the time of the Peterloo Massacre which took place on nearby St Peters Square in 1819 with some of the injured being carried here. Even though it was built in 1780, unfortunately it has no old features inside. It has a central bar, function room, and a garden area. This is a cut-through pub between Jacksons Row and Bootle street, one of only 3 in the city.

In 2014 it was threatened with demolition together with the nearby police station, and a Synagogue by a redevelopment consortium led by Gary Neville. After many protests-sighting its historic value, an asset of community and local value, and aided by CAMRA-it was eventually saved in 2017. Don't miss the mural painted on the wall commemorating the Peterloo Massacre.
 
7 The Old Nags Head, 19 Jacksons Row, M2 5WD

Observe the outside, very pretty with hanging baskets and a lovely pub sign. This is a real Manchester pub, re-built in 1880, with a classic Victorian interior featuring plenty of wood panelling, having a good atmosphere. On the first floor is a great array of pool tables, and on the 2nd floor is a roof top garden-but not always open. It gets really busy especially on match days as a Manchester United pub. Great decor with much of it dedicated to United and to George Best in particular.

In the 1960s Northern Soul fans held many a night here, the function room on the 2nd floor carries many pictures from this time. It is hard to believe the pub was once visited by Rod Stewart, The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton amongst others before playing at nearby venues. Another of the three cut-through pubs, access being from both Jackson's Row and Lloyd Street.

8 The Rising Sun, 22 Queen Street M3 3WR

This traditional pub apparently has been dated back to 1747. Check out the large range of beers and black and white pictures on the walls. This is the third of the cut-through pubs in the city, the others being The Nags Head, and The Abercrombie, connecting two streets in a block. Traditional stories tell of the police arriving at one entrance, then you can run out of the other, of if a wife was looking for her husband, again he could escape through another exit.

Emerge from the pub onto Lincoln square - spot the statue of Abraham Lincoln found here. The statue commemorates the letters of support Manchester sent to Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War, even though the cotton shortages caused by the union blockade caused severe distress and even starvation in the area.

9. The Ape and Apple, 27 John Dalton Street, M2 6FW
The pub was converted from an old bank in the late 1990's. The decor features a lot of wood panelling and screens, and makes it feel like an older pub. As a Holts pub the prices tend to be cheaper than others with a good range of beers and food. The customers are a mixed bunch, with office workers mingling with shoppers, and sports enthusiasts watching the sports channels on the large TVs found in most vantage points.
Upstairs is a large area which can be used as a function room. There is a large heated roof terrace with plentiful seating. Manchester's longest running free comedy club, Comedy Balloon is held in the upstairs room every Wednesday .The room is available for hire on other nights & many local societies meet here regularly.
10 The City Arms, 46-48 Kennedy Street, M2 4BQ

This is one of a line of 3 pubs- great if one of them is too busy, tucked away down a quiet street near the Town Hall. It is a fairly small traditional pub, decorated in dark wood, occupying a former 18th Century town house. Some nice old photos line the walls, don't miss the glazed tiling on the way to the toilet. A good variety of ales on tap. Always features in The Good Pub Guide.

11 The Waterhouse, 67-71 Princess Street, M2 4EG

Whatever you think of Weatherspoons pubs, they can always be relied on for a consistent choice of drinks and good value food. They are usually opened in historic buildings, and this one is no exception. Built in1877, and named after its designer, a leading 19th century architect Alfred Waterhouse. Waterhouse also designed the Town Hall building opposite here, Manchester’s Owens College, Manchester's Strangeways prison, as well as London's Natural History Museum.

It is believed that the building has been used as an orphanage, then a solicitors office. The original three town houses have been knocked into one unit. See if you can spot the join!!! and the original features.

If you only want to go to a couple of these pubs we would definitely recommend The Briton's Protection, Peveril of The Peak, The Nags Head, and if sunny The Rain Bar. If you have less time, I would skip The Ape and Apple and The Waterhouse. But they all have something individual about them.

Whichever pubs you visit in Manchester, you can be certain of a friendly welcome, great beers, and lots of history. Some serve food. What amazes us is the number of bars that still remain, that have not been bombed or demolished.

We hope that you have enjoyed this crawl and see you on another.

 

 

 

 

Top Ten Manchester Pubs

10. The White Lion, 43 Liverpool Road, M3 4NQ 
This pub dates back to 1778, even before the World's first modern passenger railway system was built nearby in 1830-launching the railway revolution. It is adjacent to the reconstructed foundations of a Roman fort, and over the road from the Manchester Museum of Science and Technology. Don't miss the Manchester United memorabilia featured on all the walls and interesting aerial photos featuring Manchester's past. There are lots of ales, food, and an outdoor area. Another of our favourites.


9 The Grey Horse, 80 Portland Street, M1 4QX
This welcoming locals pub is in competition with The Circus two doors down to be Manchester's smallest pub. The circus winning. It is a single room, and can get busy. It serves locally produced Hyde's beer - always good value, as well as real ale from all round the Country. Claiming to have one of the best tasting pints of Guinness in Manchester, pitchers of cocktails, weekly wine offers and a variety of lagers, there is something for everyone.
It is converted from early 19th century weavers cottages, and named after an act in the circus that used to overwinter in this block-hence the name of The Circus pub nearby. There is a tiny heated outdoor yard at the rear which can seat two people. This pub is popular after work and with real ale hunters.


8 The City Arms or The Vine, 46 Kennedy Street, M2 4BQ 
The City Arms is one of a line of 3 pubs- great if one of them is too busy-tucked away down a quiet street near the Town Hall. It is a fairly small traditional pub, decorated in dark wood, occupying a former 18th Century town house. Some nice old photos line the walls, don't miss the glazed tiling on the way to the toilet. A good variety of ales on tap. Always features in The Good Pub Guide.
The Vine next door to The City Arms dates from prior to 1886, and now occupies 2 buildings. The first is an 18th Century town house with a row of windows on the upper floor, that would resemble those in a weaver's cottage. The 2nd building used to be an office/warehouse building . Absolutely stunning green tiling on the outside, and stained glass windows. It is deceptively large, being spilt over 3 levels, check out the large range of whiskies.


7 The Castle Hotel, 66 Oldham St, M4 1LE
This pub stands out in the Northern Quarter and must be visited. It was first opened in 1776. Start by admiring the brown tiled and mosaic facade added in 1898, followed inside by a fantastic mahogany bar, with a ceramic glazed bar counter front, one of only 13 such examples in the whole of the UK. Look down for the magnificent mosaic floor of 'The Castle'. Behind the bar is the snug, containing old-fixed seating, and bell pushes. Down the corridor to a beautiful performance room with a glorious timber skylight, finally a nice compact outdoor area. It always features in The Good Pub Guide. The current owners took over in 2009, and have restored the interior to its 19th century glory. In the late 20th century many a music lover has stopped here on their way to see live acts at the local Band On the Wall music venue. In 1979 the pub hosted the famous interview between John Peel and Ian Curtis of Joy Division fame.


6 The Old Nags Head, 19 Jacksons Row, M2 5WD
Check out the outside, very pretty with hanging baskets and a lovely pub sign. This is a real Manchester pub, re-built in 1880, with a classic Victorian interior featuring plenty of wood paneling, having a good atmosphere. On the first floor is a great array of pool tables, and on the 2nd floor is a roof top garden-but not always open. It gets really busy especially on match days as a Manchester United pub. Great decor with much of it dedicated to United and to George Best in particular.
In the 1960s Northern Soul fans held many a night here, the function room on the 2nd floor carries many pictures from this time. It is hard to believe the pub was once visited by Rod Stewart, The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton amongst others before playing at nearby venues. One of Manchester's three cut-through pubs, access being from both Jackson's Row and Lloyd Street.


5 The Peveril of the Peak, 127 Great Bridgewater Street, M1 5JQ
Do not miss this late Georgian pub, if only for the Victorian emerald green external tiling. Inside fantastic decor continues, with more green and cream tiles, together with bell-pushes, a Victorian fire place, and beautiful wood features. This pub was saved from demolition for a road scheme in the 1980s. The pub is now a Grade 2 listed building and the interior is listed as one of historic importance. There are a couple of picnic benches outside.
Another point of interest is the famous football table which having first been brought into the pub in 1955, is said to be the oldest pub football table in continuous use in the UK. We are not sure if it is named after Peveril of the Peak novel by Sir Walter Scott published in 1923 or has a link to Peveril Castle in Castleton, perhaps someone will let us know. When Eric Cantona played for Manchester United, this was said to be his favourite pub.


4 Lass ‘O’Gowrie, 36 Charles Street, M1 7DB
This pub was also in "Little Ireland" and is on the map from 1844. It has done well to survive as so much around it has been demolished, and it has been threatened with closure. Apparently the original landlord was Scottish, naming the pub after his favourite poem, "The Lass O'Gowrie" by Scottish poet Lady Carolina Naime .
Hidden away in a quiet location, this pub is a must visit:- from the Victorian tiles outside, to the exquisite bar, and pictures of famous Mancunians lining the walls inside. There are lots of hand pulled ales and good food too. During the week it is visited by students with open mic and quiz nights. It tends to be quieter at the weekends. There is a small outdoor area built over the River Medlock. In the Great British Pub Awards of 2012 is was voted 'National Pub of the Year 2012'. Don't miss the toilets!!!
A plaque outside describes the pub as "A traditional Mancunian Alehouse- free of tie, on locally brewed real ales" A warm welcome awaits you, great food, cask ales, and live sports.


3 Crown & Kettle, 2 Oldham Street, M4 5FE
A pub has stood on this site since 1734, previously being called the Iron Dish & Cob of Coal. A prime location in its hay day, convenient for the nearby Smithfield markets, and the Daily Express workers-which used to be located next door. There were public toilets on the front, and 2 entrances from Great Ancoats street and one on Oldham Street. It was closed down in1989 following trouble between Manchester City and United fans, and the general decline of the whole area. The pub then suffered from vandals and a couple of arson attacks. It was reopened in 2005 and has without doubt the greatest pub ceiling in Manchester, nets have now been installed in case any plaster should fall down. The original pub was one large imposing room, three contrasting rooms now exist-the vault, a small snug and a lounge, all served from the central bar with friendly staff.
This huge Grade 2 listed building has to be visited to admire the ceiling and has a great selection of hand pulled beers. It does get busy on Manchester City match days, with fans meeting here before going to the Ethiad Stadium. It has won various awards including - Greater Manchester CAMRA regional Pub of the Year 2015 and Central Manchester Pub of the Year 2019.


2. The Briton's Protection, 50 Great Bridgewater Street, M1 5LE
This is a pub that can't be missed, stand back and admire the interesting outside. The pub opened in 1811, and was said to be a recruiting centre for soldiers enlisting to fight Napoleon, hence its name. It benefitted from having a major re-fit in the 1930s. There is a small room at the front with the bar in, which has over 300 whiskies to choose from, and a great selection of real ales. There are a further 5 rooms, in winter find the roaring fire. At the back is found a nice beer garden. Take time to examine the fantastic mural of the nearby Peterloo Massacre of 1819, in which 15 demonstrators were killed and more than 700 injured by the cavalry who charged the crowd.
The pub being situated next to the very modern Bridgewater Hall often has a very mixed clientele with theatre goers, musicians from the local Halle orchestra, and whiskey lovers joining real ale drinkers.


1  Sinclair's Oyster Bar, Cathedral Gates, M3 1SW 
This is our number one pub in Manchester or maybe the 4 pubs together are a major attraction. This is a very popular area, so arrive early to get a seat. Great for beer in the sun whilst basking in historic surroundings. You may never wish to leave. The prices in Sinclair's are some of the cheapest in Manchester, when we visited it was a cash only bar. Note the pub sign, for 58 years the pub was run by an ex-soldier named John Shaw. In the 18th century by law closing time was 8pm, if customers were still there the maid Molly Owen would throw a bucket of water over them. After John Shaws' death in 1796 it was re-named Sinclair's, oysters being added to the menu and name in 1845.


Sinclair's is Grade 2 listed, and dates from 1738, having survived World War II and the Arndale Bombing in 1996. The Old Wellington pub next door, and Sinclair's Oyster Bar have been moved twice,1st in 1971 to make room for the Arndale Centre, and then in 1996 they were moved brick by brick from their location 300 meters away to their current site as part of a regeneration project. The Old Wellington pub next door is the city centre's only surviving Tudor building and is the oldest building of its kind in Manchester, being built in 1552. Check out the inside of The Wellington and plaque on the outside. On the 3rd side of the square is the Mitre Hotel built in 1815, next door to that is The Crown and Anchor-a Joseph Holts pub. One need never leave these 4 pubs.
If you were to visit thess pubs in a one day pub crawl. I might suggest the following order:- Arrive at Deansgate Station, to The White Lion, Nag's Head, Briton's Protection, Peveril of the Peak, Lass 'O'Gowrie, Grey Horse, City Arms/Vine, Crown and Kettle, The Castle and finally Sinclair's.


Whichever pubs you visit in Manchester, you can be certain of a friendly welcome, great beers, and lots of history. Some serve food. What amazes us is the number of bars that still remain, that have not been bombed or demolished. We hope that you enjoyed the crawl.